Local Water Utilities Anticipate Higher Rates Due to New EPA Rule

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently proposed a new rule that limits the amount of PFAS, also known as “forever chemicals,” in drinking water. PFAS are correlated to cancer, high cholesterol, birth defects, infertility, weakened childhood immunity, endocrine disruption, weight gain, and more. These man-made chemicals are found in 99.9 percent of the population’s blood. 

The EPA said, “This rule will prevent thousands of deaths and reduce tens of thousands of serious PFAS-attributable illnesses.”

The new regulations will require PFAS to be at zero parts per trillion or unitless in public water. The EPA says the changes will keep people safe and are aiming to complete regulation standards by the end of 2023. 

Patrick Berge, a city Public Works Director, said, “If the EPA imposes these new regulations, Public Works will have to figure out how to filter the PFAS out of the water and dispose of them safely. That would be an expense to the rate-payer. You can be talking anywhere from a few million to tens of millions.” 

Ben Harris, a Utility District General Manager, said, “It will cost millions,” and that it would be difficult to follow.

The EPA stated that the alterations are crucial to ensure the safety of individuals from PFAS. The agency intends to achieve the final regulation by the conclusion of this year.

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Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com

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PFAS to be Regulated in U.S. Drinking Water

For the first time, the United States government will regulate PFAS (Perfluoroaklyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances) in the nation’s drinking water. PFAS do not break down under typical environmental conditions due to their tight chemical bond structure, which is why they are also dubbed “Forever chemicals.” It is suspected that these man-made chemicals can remain in the environment for thousands of years, though they have only been around for 60 years. 

Widely used in firefighting foams, cosmetics, non-stick cookware (Teflon), anti-static spray, clothing, pesticides, and much more, PFAS effortlessly contaminates soil and drinking water. Eventually, PFAS made its way into the food chain. It is estimated that 99.9 percent of people worldwide have PFAS in their bloodstream, including more than 200 million Americans in all 50 states. 

Due to their unbreakable nature, these cancer-causing carcinogens are in drinking water nationwide. Moreover, they slip through many filters and are undetectable by smell, taste, or sight. PFAS has been associated with various cancers, immune deficiencies, pregnancy complications, birth defects, and more. 

Now, a new regulatory proposal from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would finally limit the amount of PFAS allowed in public drinking water. 

EPA administrator Michael Regan said, “EPA’s proposal to establish a national standard for PFAS in drinking water is informed by the best available science and would help provide states with the guidance they need to make decisions that best protect their communities.” 

A senior scientist at Environmental Working Group (EWG), David Andrews said, “The entire class of PFAS chemicals is a health concern. Action to reduce exposure cannot come soon enough.” 

If you are worried about PFAS in your drinking water, contact the water treatment experts at Reynolds Water today. 

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/ 

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Jackson to Share Water with Napoleon Township Thanks to $5M Grant 

The city of Jackson will now share its water with over 6,800 Napoleon Township residents thanks to a $5 million federal grant from the Consolidated Appropriations Act. 

Due to limitations and environmental concerns about its own water system, the township inquired into this partnership, according to Jackson Spokesman Aaron Dimick. The new 16-inch water main will be constructed over roughly nine-and-a-half miles along M-50 to Napoleon Township. 

United States Representative Tim Walberg, R-Tipton, proposed the Napoleon/M-50 Water Main Transmission Project as part of his 2022 member-designated projects. 

Walberg said, “Having had many conversations with local officials and constituents throughout Jackson County, it is clear that Napoleon Township is in significant need of water system improvements as they are outgrowing their existing system.” 

There is no specific timeline for the project, but Napoleon Township will secure capital to cover the cost of using Jackson water. City officials said the partnership would not cause Jackson water customers to accrue any extra fees. 

Napoleon Township Supervisor Dan Glalagher said, “This grant for a new, consistent source of clean water will greatly help Napoleon’s future business development, enhance growth of the area, and provide a backbone for the community’s long range goals.” 

Jackson’s Director of Public Works, Mike Osborn, said, “Our water treatment plant has the capacity to produce 24 million gallons of treated water a day and we’re currently only producing five million a day, so our facility definitely has the ability to be a regional water source.” 

A total of 16 groundwater wells are tapped into for Jackson’s water, which goes into the Earth about 400 feet below the surface of an underground aquifer. Then, the water is transferred by pump to a water treatment plant, where it is cleaned and tested. 

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/ 

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Michigan Creek Alarmingly Bright Green

Residents came across an alarming sight on December 12th. Plaster Creek was bright green near Cease E. Chaves Avenue, which borders Grand Rapids and Wyoming. Photos were taken by Steven Littell, and alerted authorities.

By the time the city of Grand Rapids got there on Monday, they had said the green color was gone. Various reporters who arrived the following day verified they saw nothing from the ordinary.    

“My significant other and I were driving by, and she said, ‘Look at the creek.’ I stopped and it was fluorescent green. It was like almost glowing. So, I got out and got a couple shots,” said Steven Littell and then notified others. “I came back and checked on it for the next hour or so — it ran green for pretty close to an hour.”

“It worried me. I thought somebody was dumping something that shouldn’t have been dumped in there. It didn’t look right. This goes right to the Grand, right to Lake Michigan, so it worried me,” said Littell.

Jeff Johnston, a spokesperson from the Michigan Dept. of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy said staff inspected the creek at the specified location noted from Littell and found that the green color had already run clear.

“The color appears to have been from a dye test, likely performed near where the color was observed, and that material dissipates quickly,” said Johnston.

The maintenance superintendent for Grand Rapids Wastewater and Stormwater agreed that it looked like a green dye test to determine where water is flowing. However, the city clarified that they did not run any such test on Monday.

The mystery continues as to exactly what and who caused this water change. If you are aware of any information, please share it with the Michigan Dept. of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy, or the City of Grand Rapids at: esd@grcity.us.  

For pure, clean drinking water, contact Reynold’s Water Conditioning today.

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/

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29 Michigan Water Systems Awarded Protection Grants

protected water

Fresh, clean water is something many Michiganders might take for granted. Over 10 million people throughout the state rely on clean drinking water through the Great Lakes, so protecting it is crucial to ensure safe, healthy water is available for future generations. 

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) recently granted more than $436,000 to 29 public water systems throughout the state. The money awarded will also help fund programs to protect clean water sources and educate the public about the origins of their water and how to keep it clean.

Ranging from $1,675 to $70,000, the grants include updated plans for ten wellhead protection areas. Applicants must match 50 percent of the funds for the projects, develop a water protection team, and show long-term commitment to their source water protection programs. 

Sara Pearson, a source water unit supervisor with ELGE’s Drinking Water and Environmental Health Division (DWEHD) said, “EGLE is on the job every day working with Michigan’s 1,381 community water systems to deliver safe water to residents. But the first and most crucial step in the process is to ensure that the lakes, rivers, or groundwater wells that deliver that water are free of contaminants. These grants will help communities keep those water sources safe and reliable.”

September 25 through October 1 was Source Water Protection Week, as announced by the American Water Works Association. The grants were revealed in conjunction with this special week. 

To discover where your drinking water originates, search the Drinking Water Toolkit. 

Need further assistance with clean water? You’ve come to the right place; Reynolds Water has the equipment you need for clean, pure water for your home or office.

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/

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Flint Water Still Tainted with Toxic Lead

Just as we thought it was over, the Flint lead water crisis continues. During testing over the first half of this year, the level of lead in the city’s tap water has increased. State environmental officials attribute the spike to additional testing of businesses known to have lead in their service lines. 

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) recently shared the results of Flint’s Lead and Copper Rule testing, saying samples taken from 61 homes and businesses showed 90 percent registered lead readings of lead at or below 10 parts per billion (ppb).

The federal action level is currently set at 15 ppb, so the Flint results are lower than the 90th percentile. The most recent testing is the second consecutive water sampling period that showed an increase in samples higher than 15 ppb. The first half of 2022 registered at 10 ppb, while during the first six months of 2021, it was 3 ppb; the last half of 2021, 7 ppb. 

In Michigan, the threshold for lead will increase from 12 ppb to 15 ppb starting in 2025. Currently, all public water systems are required to test tap water for lead and copper. If levels are found above 15 ppb in the system’s 90th percentile, actions must be taken to remediate the metals.

As for Flint, city officials have acknowledged that the water testing system was deeply flawed before the crisis of 2016. Federal regulations required the water to be tested in homes with lead service lines, but Flint failed to focus on these situations. 

EGLE attributes the latest heightened test results to Flint’s increasing Tier 2 non-residential sites. Fewer homes have lead service lines, thanks to the city’s program to replace lead and galvanized steel water service lines in response to the crisis. More than 95 percent of Flint homes no longer have lead and/or copper in their service lines. 

However, this has now triggered the addition of non-residential testing sites. Kris Donaldson, EGLE’s clean drinking water public advocate, said, “As Flint nears completion of its lead service line replacement program, we are seeing clear evidence that the focus will need to shift to interior plumbing and continued education on how to reduce lead exposures in the home as outlined on the state’s MI Lead Safe website.” 

After the Flint water crisis, Michigan adopted the country’s toughest lead rules for drinking water in 2018. Now, all public water systems are required to replace an average of five percent of lead service lines every year for the next 20 years. 

Test and Remove Lead from your home or business’s drinking water with Reynold’s Water Conditioning equipment!  

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/ 

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Toxic Chemical Spill in the Huron River

As of August 2nd, the State of Michigan is advising people to avoid the Huron River downstream of the city of Wixom. Chemicals from Tribar Technologies, an auto supply factory manufacturing chrome plating, were accidentally released into the sewer system, which discharges into the Huron River.

The release of several thousand gallons of Hexavalent chromium, was discovered by Tribar on August 1st; however, they indicated that the spill could have occurred as early as Saturday morning, July 30th

Hexavalent chromium, or hex chrome, is a carcinogenic chemical used in plastic finishing. It can cause numerous health problems through inhalation, skin contact, and ingestion. Because it is so hazardous, companies generally use other harmful chemicals such as PFAS or “forever chemicals” to coat plating baths to help protect workers from chromium inhalation.

The Huron River runs through multiple counties before flowing into Lake Erie. Ann Arbor is the largest city on its banks, which draws its drinking water from. Experts believe the contaminants should not reach the city’s water intake for several weeks.

In the meantime, the Michigan Department of Health (DHHS) advises all people and their pets to avoid contact with the Huron River between North Wixom Road in Oakland County and Kensington Road in Livingston County. Norton Creek, Hubbell Pond (aka the Mill Pond) in Oakland County, and Kent Lake are included in this advisory.

People should not wade, play, or swim in the water. People should not drink from, water their plants, or consume fish caught from the Huron river.  

How these chemicals were spilled is still unknown. Authorities are continuing their investigation and assessment efforts. Liesl Clark, director of the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy (EGLE) says, “Our teams are in the field now assessing the situation. We will stay on the job as long as it takes to ensure residents are safe and impacts to the ecosystem are minimized.”

DHHS is urging people with questions regarding potential hex chrome exposure to call the MI Toxic Hotline at 800-648-6942, between 8 am-5 pm.

This is not Tribar Technologies first mishap. The current “Do Not Eat” fish advisory is still in place for the Huron river, largely due to their release of PFAS chemicals. In February 2022, parts of the Huron River were shut down in Wayne County due to the discovery of an oil spill traced back to Flat Rock Metal Inc.

Toxic contamination in our drinking waters unfortunately is still an issue that requires more oversight and protection from all. More and more members of Michigan and federal government are starting to take notice.

For pure, clean, quality drinking water, contact Reynold’s Water Conditioning today.

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/ 

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Milford Drinking Water Endangered by Underground Contamination

milfords drinking water

A treatment system is swiftly being constructed in the Village of Milford to counteract underground contamination seeping into the drinking water system from a former automotive supplier (Kelsey-Hayes) plant. The toxic plume is threatening the community of roughly 6,500 people by exposing them to vinyl chloride. 

According to the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy, an unsafe level of the dangerous chemical was detected in a monitoring well in May, located only 150 feet from Milford’s drinking water intake system. 

Though the toxin has not officially been detected in the public water supply, it “Represents an imminent and substantial endangerment to the public health, safety, welfare, or the environment,” according to the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE). 

Milford Village Manager Christian Wuerth said, “It’s not a good thing. When you get something like this and it hits close, it’s obviously a concern. I live here, my family’s here, I’ve got friends here. The concern is for everyone in the community and making sure we’ve got clean drinking water.” 

In 1989, the village found a chemical called cis-1,2- dichloroethane, a toxic organic compound, in water found below a vacant downtown parcel once owned by Kelsey-Hayes, according to Kevin Wojciechowski, project manager of EGLE’s remediation and redevelopment sector. 

Kelsey-Hayes closed its doors and demolished its manufacturing plant in 2001. In 2015, ZF Active Safety US acquired the business after taking over TRW Automotive. According to Wojciechowski, ZF is now responsible for the cleanup of the Milford property.

Tony Sapienza, a ZF spokesman, said, “ZF is fully committed to continuing our longstanding working relationship with EGLE and the Village of Milford to ensure that these ongoing activities at the site address impacts from the former industrial operations and that they meet the timelines specified in the administrative order.” 

Wojciechowski said, “This is something that EGLE and the village and others have been dealing with, unfortunately, for a long time. The vinyl chloride is something new that’s come about, but we’ve had a long issue out here of dealing with these issues in the village.”

Don’t let contaminated, toxic water affect you or your family. Contact Reynolds Water today to schedule a consultation and ensure your drinking and shower water is pure and pristine.

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/

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Novel Technology Can Remediate Forever Chemicals in Water

scary water of DEATH

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances called PFAS are virtually indestructible and infiltrate the bodies of more than 200 million Americans in all 50 states. These cancer-causing carcinogens are present in drinking water across the country.

These man-made chemicals are tough and durable and have been widely used for their ability to repel oil and water in firefighting foams, cosmetics, non-stick cookware (Teflon), anti-static spray, and more. You can’t see, taste, or smell PFAS, so it’s impossible to know whether your water is contaminated unless you test for it. 

Since PFAS do not break down over time in the environment, they can easily contaminate soil and drinking water. Over time, these chemicals make their way into the food chain, with 99.9 percent of people worldwide having PFAS in their bloodstream.

PFAS have been around for more than 60 years, and remediation has yet to be discovered…until now.  Battelle, a scientific nonprofit, has developed a new technology that can finally eliminate PFAS. Using water oxidation, supercritical chemical bonds can be broken down in just seconds.

Amy Dindal, PFAS program manager for Battelle said, “The [PFAS] threat is real. ‘Supercritical water’ means that you increase the temperature and increase the pressure and you get it into a special state, where the oxidation will occur more naturally. So in this special state, it breaks the [carbon–fluorine] bond.”

Battelle claims it has successfully utilized the process to destroy PFAS in drinking water and has started partnering with the waste management company Heritage Crystal-Clean for further testing.

Brian Recatto, CEO of Heritage Crystal-Clean, said, “I absolutely think it’s an answer that nobody has had before. We’re hoping to have a scalable version of the plant within six- to eight months.”

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at www.reynoldswater.com or call 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: www.cpsmi.com.

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Michigan’s Underground Storage Tanks are Raising Concern

Legacy tanks typically store fuel and other hazardous chemicals underground. These tanks generally receive a little-to-no maintenance and were buried before strict regulations were established.

Experts are concerned about the chemicals leaching into municipal drinking water.  A recent fuel leak in Flat Rock was suspected to be caused by a pair of underground steel tanks. The fuel spread to the Huron River by a tributary, as spotted by a fisherman.

After a swift cleanup and containment efforts (such as closing the park), the Flat Rock tanks are a microcosm for a much more significant issue throughout the entire state. Over 8,000 underground storage tanks are potentially leaking, according to the state of Michigan.

Jill Greenberg, an employee of the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy, said, “Of the 24,000 contaminated sites, 8,000 are leaky underground storage tanks. If there’s a property transaction and the owner knows about contamination, they are legally required to disclose it.”

Companies that are no longer in business are notorious for abandoning tanks as far back as 100 years ago. Greenberg suggested a need for heavier funding to address the unregistered sites, such as those in Flat Rock. However, state leaders anticipate a budget of $163 million to locate and remedy the tanks that have slipped through time.

The overwhelming feeling at the state and federal levels is that these storage tanks pose an urgent crisis that cannot continue to be ignored. Some representatives believe infrastructure dollars should be used toward the tanks.

The Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE) said, “EGLE inherited an outdated it system that heavily relied on paper records. We are in the process of upgrading our system and that will allow us to categorize, cross reference and track the contaminated properties we know about.”

United States Representative Debbie Dingell said the tanks in Flat Rock were 100 years old and said, “Nobody had a record of them. I’m sure there’s situations like that all over the state.”

The State of Michigan’s Office of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs is working in conjunction with EGLE to address the tanks. Unfortunately, holding current property owners accountable is fruitless, since many of the tanks were abandoned decades ago. Regardless, regulations should be established now to minimize surprises in the future.

Are you worried about chemicals in your water? Contact the water purification experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning today.

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at www.reynoldswater.com or call 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing staff at Creative Programs & Systems: www.cpsmi.com.

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