The Importance of High-Quality Drinking Water

Hydration is key to all living things, and without it, we would only live for about five days. Our bodies are more than 50% water and it helps maintain our normal body temperature, lubricates joints, and enables the body to rid waste through urination, sweat, and bowel movements. Doctors advise us to drink at least eight 8 oz. glasses of water every day and studies have shown that women, on average, will consume approximately 91 oz. of water and men will drink about 125 oz. of water every day. Part of this consumption of water is from foods such as fruits and vegetables. It seems quite simple why water is so important to our health, but understanding the different risks from contaminations and how to protect your drinking water can be more in-depth.

Is Tap Water Safe?

In general, tap water is considered to be safe to consume if it comes from a public water system that is run and maintained by a municipality. When drinking water exits a treatment facility and travels to your home, the quality standards must reach strict safety requirements. Unfortunately, even with these safety policies, it does not mean that the water is free of any contaminants, but that the levels of the pollutants are low enough not to cause any health risks. Accidents do happen and if the water supply does become contaminated with something that can create illness, the supplier must inform consumers within 24 hours and offer alternative suggestions for safe drinking water.

Types of Contaminations

There are a few ways that water can become contaminated. Water can contain microorganisms like parasites and bacteria that are added to the water from human or animal feces. It can also become contaminated from industrial waste such as spraying crops that contain chemicals or nitrates used in fertilizers that run off the land. Sometimes the natural deposits from underground can have various minerals like lead or mercury that can enter the water supply. Lead can also transfer to a water source through old lead pipes as well. Even pipes that claim to be “lead-free” can contain as much as 8% lead. To avoid lead consumption when using tap water, use water from the cold tap and to let the water run for a minute before using it.

A Solution to the Problem

Often, when a contamination notice is sent to homes about a water crisis, it is advised to boil your water for 24 to 48 hours, so many consumers are under the impression that contaminates can be removed by heating the water to cleanse it. Boiling water will indeed kill germs; however, contaminants such as lead, nitrates, and pesticides will not affectedly be removed using this method.  It may have an opposite consequence since boiling will reduce the amount of water when it evaporates, making the concentration of the contaminate even higher. There are four main types of water filters that are more beneficial for contaminant removal:

  • Activated Carbon Filters – These can remove organic contaminants that change the taste and smell. Certain systems are designed to remove chemicals such as chlorination by-products, pesticides, and some metals like copper or lead.
  • Reverse Osmosis – This filtration system can remove nitrates, sodium, pesticides, and petrochemicals.
  • Ion Exchange – This type of filter can remove minerals like calcium and magnesium, and they are used in combination with other systems such as carbon absorption or reverse osmosis.
  • Distillation – This method creates distilled water by collecting condensation of steam from boiling water.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your home’s unique water quality needs, including arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more. To learn more information on our water treatment solutions, including water softeners and conditionerswater filtration and purificationreverse osmosis drinking water, and iron and odor removal, visit https://reynoldswater.com.



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Water Filters 101


Water is one of the most important elements on this planet and without it, we would only live a few short days. Our bodies are made up of roughly two-thirds of H2O and to keep a healthy balance, we need to consume 2.4 liters of water each day. It comes to no surprise that new ways are constantly being found in order to provide us with more clean, pure water to nourish ourselves. In order to remove many of the harmful impurities from our water, the use of water filters is a solution to this problem. How important are water filters you may ask? Let’s take a closer look at what a water filter is.

How Filters Work

Water filters use two different techniques in the removal of dirt and debris. The first is physical filtration in which water is strained by a physical barrier such as a thin gauze or fine textile membrane to remove the larger particles. The second method is done thorough chemical filtration, which involves water passing through an active material, such as carbon, that removes impurities as they pass through chemically. There are 4 primary methods used for water filters that use a combination of physical and chemical filtration:

Activated Carbon Filters

This type of filter is the most common and popular of the options available that are based on charcoal. Charcoal is a form of Carbon that is very porous because it has a big internal surface area that can trap foreign particles. Larger contaminants are stuck on the outside, thus being removed from the water. Carbon can also act as a magnet for items such as lead and VOCs that continue to remove particles internally as water passes through the filter. On the chemical aspect, chemicals like Chlorine are removed during a chemical reaction when water is in contact with Carbon. The main disadvantage of this type of filter is after time it will get clogged with impurities and need to be replaced, which can add additional costs down the road. 

Reverse Osmosis

Filtration that removes contaminants by water pressure to force tap water through a semipermeable membrane is called Reverse Osmosis. The membrane is an effective, very fine filter that allows the water to pass through but the contaminants like Lead, Mercury, and Iron stay behind. The downside is certain items such as some pesticides, solvents, and metals like Chlorine and Radon can not be removed with Reverse Osmosis.

Distillation

A natural option for filtration can be done with the simple process of steam distillation that involves heating water to boiling and then cooling the steam to remove the contaminants. Most contaminants have a higher boiling point than water which is why they are left behind when the water becomes steam. The steam is collected and transformed back to water in a separate container. The disadvantage to this type of filtration is some contaminants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) boil at a lower temperature than water and they evaporate with the steam and can remove beneficial minerals in natural water during the filtration process.

Ion Exchange

This filter is very good at softening hard water by removing limescale. The process is done with chemical filtration method by releasing ions, like sodium, and exchange them for unwanted ions like heavy metals found in your water. The result is better-tasting water, however, the sodium is simply another form of contaminant, so the ion exchange doesn’t exactly make the water “pure”. This option is not the best for people on low-sodium diets. The second disadvantage of ion-exchange filtration is that it will need to recharge the filters occasionally with more sodium ions by adding a certain type of salt.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditionerswater filtration and purificationreverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.



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Types of Salt for Your Water Softener

As a homeowner, certain appliances will need to be maintained in order to keep your house running efficiently, including your water softener. Regularly, the salt supply will need to be replenished in order to keep hard water from coming into your water system. While out shopping, you may find yourself questioning what the best choice for salt is exactly where to purchase since there is a variety of choices to choose from. In today’s article we will discuss the difference between those salt options and help you decide which choice is best for your softener and home.

Sodium Chloride Options

Water softeners or conditioners can be used with either sodium chloride (most commonly called salt) or potassium chloride. When at your local grocery store or home improvement store one thing to keep in mind when looking at the bags for purchase is the purity levels. Many of the bags sold in these places will contain a high level of water-insoluble material. This impurity over time can cause buildup in the water reservoir or cause the water softener to not function properly. If you notice this buildup occurring the brine tank will need to be cleaned more often to avoid this from happening in the future. A closer look at sodium chloride and you will see there are 3 different forms to choose from: pellets, crystal, or block salt. Salt pellets are the most common and typically are less costly than potassium pellets. Like many things found in the consumer world spending a little more money upfront for higher quality products is well worth the expense since this typically will mean less maintenance and fewer cleanings needed to keep your softener functioning efficiently.

Potassium Chloride as Alternative

If sodium chloride doesn’t seem to be the right fit for your home’s needs, the alternative option can be potassium chloride for your brine tank. Potassium chloride is 99.9% sodium-free, so this option is great for individuals who are looking to decrease their sodium intake. The largest disadvantage with this type is the price tag attached, which is much higher in comparison to sodium chloride. It can also be less readily available when searching at your local stores with fewer options. Switching your home from sodium to potassium may require an increase of salt dosage on the program settings value by an extra 10% to guarantee proper regeneration. If needing assistance with this, Reynolds Water Conditioning technicians can assist with this.

Salt Maintenance Tips

Checking your salt level inside your brine tank monthly is recommended. If your system regenerates more frequently, more checks and salt refills will need to be done more often as well. The salt in the brine tank should be at least 3 to 4 inches above the water level, but less than 4 inches below the top of the brine tank for best efficiency. If regular checks on the salt levels are performed you will begin to have nonconditioned water through the household and will notice hard water as indicated by an orange appearance and foul odor. Be sure to loosen any hardened salt around the edges of the tank or any large solid masses (also known as salt bridges) before adding additional salt each time.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditionerswater filtration and purificationreverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.

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Ways To Improve Your Homes Water Quality


Homeowners that are looking to improve the quality of the water in their homes are often confused between the available water treatment options.  There is a big difference in how you treat your homes water based on the issues it has.  Your water may contain containments, be high in harmful minerals, or may just smell and taste off; depending on the exact issue you can determine what type of water treatment system will bring the highest quality water to your family.

A Look into Water Softeners and Reverse Osmosis Water Systems

Reverse osmosis is described simply as a system that provides filtration.  RO water filtration units are extremely popular amongst homeowners as they provide a point of use system that brings better tasting, healthier water.  RO systems are especially popular amongst homeowners with wells.  A reverse osmosis water treatment system removes the contaminants and dissolved minerals in your water by forcing them through a filter.  Benefits of including either a point of use RO or whole home RO include:

  • Flavorless Water: A RO system will remove the funny taste in your homes water by eliminating the source of the taste within the water.
  • Doesn’t Use Chemicals: Reverse osmosis water treatment systems are environmentally friendly as they do not use chemicals to filter water.
  • Soft Water: Minerals cause hard water; reverse osmosis systems filter and remove the minerals in the water that cause hard water.  Whole house reverse osmosis systems can eliminate corrosion in pipes.
  • Odor and Color Removal: Occasionally contaminants and dissolved minerals in the water will cause a strange smell and odor.  RO systems work to filter these pollutants and minerals giving you a higher quality water supply.

The quality of your homes well water is often improved with the installation of a RO filtration systems.  Whether you install a whole house or point of use reverse osmosis unit your homes water will taste and smell better. 

Water softeners are often described as water conditioners.  Unlike a RO in which a filter physically removes contaminants and dissolved minerals from the homes water, a water softener processes water through an ionization process that replaces magnesium and calcium ions with sodium ions. 

Hard water is known to contain increased levels of dissolved minerals such as magnesium and calcium.  The water softening unit softens the water by exchanging these minerals with sodium, a less destructive mineral.  Hard water can cause a great deal of problems in the home and water softeners help to mitigate them.  If you notice plumbing corrosion because of hard water a water softening unit can help.  It is important to note however that a water softener is not a filtration system and does not remove other contaminants.  Benefits of water softened using a water softener include:

  • Natural Tasting Water
  • Stain Free, Brighter Laundry
  • Spot Free Cleaner Dishes
  • Longer Lasting Appliances
  • Fewer Clogged Pipes

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.



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Removing Iron and Manganese from Well Water


How many homeowners can honestly say they would be okay drinking water from their taps that comes out brown?  ZERO, that’s how many!  Brown water occurs because of contamination in their water from Iron and Manganese, common elements found in well water.  Thankfully there are water treatment options available to remove these contaminants.  Both Iron and Manganese are found in soil thus washing into the well water drinking supply.  The good thing is that you don’t have to live with contaminants in your water.

Contaminants in your homes water supply certainly can be a nuisance. Iron and Manganese cause several issues including metallic tasting water, stained laundry, clogged plumbing, and an oily or crust sheen on the surface of the water. This is one of the reasons high levels of the contaminants are treated using whole house water treatment systems.

In 1974 the federal government set in place visual standards for water because of the effects of Iron and Manganese.  Although state health-based standards are not in place for metals in drinking water, there are some concerns that high levels of manganese are bad for formula-fed infants. Infant formulas naturally contain manganese, so the National Health Department recommends mixing formula with water with a low manganese level. 

Iron and Manganese Testing

It is easy to recognize elevated levels or iron and manganese in water including a bitter, metallic taste and orangish-brown staining on bathroom fixtures, clothes, and more.  It is however important to test the water before treating it in order to determine the amount of minerals and metals that are in the water.  Two types of metals are commonly found in a homes water supply including reduced and oxidized.  Water that has a reduction in iron and manganese often looks clear, initially however will form solid orangish brown solid particles.  Water with oxidized iron and manganese will have visible particles upon being drawn from the well. 

Water Treatment Options

Once your well water is tested and you are told what type and amounts of iron and manganese are in the water, water treatment specialists like the ones at Reynolds Water Conditioning can help you determine the best treatment option for your home.  It is important to note that some filtration such as oxidation filtration which injects oxygen into the water to remove impurities only removes iron.  The water will need an additional chemical treatment to remove manganese. 

Water softeners are often installed to treat hard water.  They can also remove small amount of iron and manganese.  Water softening units use an ion exchange process which replaces iron and manganese with sodium.  The metals are removed from the softeners filtering resin through a process of backwashing. 

Another treatment option to remove iron and manganese from water is through a point of use reverse osmosis systems.  This treats water at the tap which is usually where drinking and cooking water is drawn from.  The filter uses different membranes to remove unwanted molecules in water to be filtered from the water.  Although this is a fairly simple method of getting water without metal it does not treat water throughout the house.  Thus, staining will still occur in bathrooms and in laundry and water in other parts of the house will have the metallic taste. 

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.



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Should I Install A Reverse Osmosis System Even If I Have A Water Softener?


Hard water is not uncommon.  In fact, it is said that up to 85% of homes in the United States have hard water.  Many of these homeowners are treating their hard water issue with the installation of a water softener.  Although a water softener can help with the hardness of your homes water and remove slight impurities it doesn’t get them all.  In order to remove a greater number of impurities in your homes water along with the sodium from your water softener, it is often recommended to have a reverse osmosis unit installed. 

The combined use of both a water softener and reverse osmosis systems provides high quality water.  The reverse osmosis membranes are delicate.  A RO system alone will be inadequate in a home with hard water because of the amount of calcium and magnesium in the water.  Calcium and magnesium are the main minerals that make water hard.  A RO has a small sediment filter, but it is not nearly big enough to remove the calcium and magnesium impurities that a water softening unit does.  Homeowners that install a water softener with a reverse osmosis drinking water system will extend the life of the RO membranes.  The water softener/conditioner works as a protective barrier for the RO. 

Increased drinking water quality is another reason that homeowners should consider installing a whole house water softener and a point of use reverse osmosis system in the kitchen.  This allows the water coming from the kitchen tap and the lines going into the refrigerator to be of the highest quality.  A reverse osmosis water treatment system takes the water a step further than what your water softener can which helps to ensure the water that you are ingesting is of the purest quality. 

Another benefit of using a combination of a water softener and reverse osmosis system is the savings in energy expenses, increased lifespan of household appliances, and a decrease need for soap, shampoo, and detergents.  Reverse osmosis systems eliminate the need for bottled drinks which saves families a great deal of money. 

Homeowners can see how the installation of a softener and RO in combination with one another will reduce household expenses and top-quality water. 

Choosing A Reverse Osmosis Drinking Water System

If homeowners have a whole house water softener installed, consider a RO system that does not interfere with its operation.  Evaluate a variety of systems from level of noise they make to how complex filter maintenance is. Using a RO system with your homes water softener allows you to give your family the highest quality drinking water.  Who doesn’t want that for their family’s water supply?

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.



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What You Need to Know Before You Purchase Any Water Treatment System for Your Home


First things first, have the water in your home tested by professional water treatment specialist.  Take labeled water samples from each faucet in your home in for treatment.  Believe it or not water from the kitchen sink may not test for the same contaminants as the water in the bathroom or laundry room.  This could happen for a number of reasons but is important to ensure proper treatment of the water in your home.  Processing different points of access will also allow you to recognize issues that can be corrected with whole house water treatment systems such as water softeners or point of use water treatment solutions such as reverse osmosis and water filtration systems. 

If the water in your home tests positive for contaminants, then the installation of a treatment system could be the next necessary step in remedying the issue.   When you have to install a water treatment solution it is important that you understand these systems will require routine maintenance and care.  It is crucial that homeowners understand that containment free water requires effort on the part of the homeowner no matter water treatment solution is installed.  Water filtration systems will need new filters installed, water softeners will require the input of salt or potassium chloride, and reverse osmosis systems will require cleaning of existing filters and new filters. 

It is important for consumers to be smart when having their water tested.  Some man-made chemicals that have been found in the water supply of homes have been associated with serious health problems.  These contaminates are not always found in without special analysis.  If you suspect the results of your water tests are inaccurate then it is important to have the water tested more thoroughly by a state certified laboratory.  Most general water treatment companies can see basic water quality components such as water hardness, pH, arsenic, iron, and sulfur. 

After you are sure the results of your homes water are accurate and have been analyzed to your satisfaction the levels that have been detected will tell you what type and level of water treatment is needed. 

Once this process has been satisfactorily completed the next step is to choose a system to treat your homes water.  Depending on your water analysis you can determine if you need whole house treatment, point of use treatment, or both.  Choose products that come from companies that can offer an established reputation and can offer referrals.   Often times companies that sell water treatment systems such as reverse osmosis, iron filtration, water softeners and conditioners will also offer service plans, maintenance options, and salt and potassium chloride delivery. 

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.



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Reverse Osmosis Improving Your Homes Water Quality

Everybody knows there are a number of ways in which you can improve the quality of water in your home.  What adds increases your homes water quality may not be the same system that is bringing quality water to your neighbor.  Your waters specific needs are based on exactly what issues are found when analyzing your homes water.

One system that is often recommended to improve your water is a reverse osmosis drinking water system.  If your water is analyzed and has a high concentration of metals, minerals, or microorganisms a reverse osmosis may be your best option.  Reverse osmosis systems improve the overall taste of the water in your home.  Below we will answer a number of questions that are often asked about RO, reverse osmosis, water treatment solutions.

Can you use a RO system to remove sodium in your water?

YES!  RO can remove up to ninety eight percent of sodium in your homes water.  It is a perfect combination when homeowners are concerned with the sodium levels in their water from using a water softener. RO systems also are used to remove chlorine, lead, nitrates, and several other impurities in your water.

What is the difference between the four and five stage RO systems?

Four Stage RO: A four stage RO system is used within most homes where the water is being treated by a whole house water treatment unit such as an iron filter or water softener.

Five Stage RO: When a whole house water treatment unit is not used within the home the best option is to use a five stage RO system.  This option gives you additional protection in an added filter for contaminants such as arsenic and nitrates.

There is no need to use a RO system less than four state as it will not provide the needed filtration.  The opposite is true of any RO system over five stage which is an overkill and considered a waste of money.  Filters are costly and the more filters that need to be changed the more money spent.  Why waste money on RO filters that are not adding to the actual filtration of the water.

Can a RO system be used in conjunction with an ice maker or my refrigerator water?

YES!  RO refrigerator kits are available with thirty-foot hoses and all the fittings needed to be used with your home’s refrigerator.  Think about the crystal-clear water and un-cloudy ice cubes you will be enjoying when your refrigerators RO system is used.

To understand if a RO system could improve the quality of your homes drinking water bring in a sample of your water to be analyzed by the experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.

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The Basics of Choosing the Right Water Softener For Your Home and Family

 

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Water softeners take bathing to an all new level, especially after accepting and coming accustomed to hard water showers.   If you are ready to bathe in silky smooth water, if you are excited for clear uncolored, smell free water, and if you are anxious to stop cleaning with harsh rust removers, we might just have the perfection solution for you.

Choosing a water softener, often misspelled as “water softner”, we can help with options ranging from traditional household water softeners, salt-free water softeners, dual- tank softeners and combinations that include reverse osmosis, whole house filters, arsenic removal and more.

Issues With Hard Water

Water softeners solve the problem of hard water.  When your homes water is filled with extra minerals such as calcium, magnesium carbonate or manganese it is considered hard.  Some homeowners note that soap doesn’t lather correctly, their dishes are spotted, sinks and tubs have rings, bright colored laundry looks dingy, skin feels rough, and other annoying side effects.  An analysis of your homes water is the only way to truly “diagnosis” your homes water and determine if a water softener is truly the right solution. These extra minerals don’t normally pose a risk to your overall health however, not treating hard water can cause issues with your homes plumbing, water heating system, appliances, and such.  In research done by the U.S. Geological Survey over eighty five percent of American homes have problems with hard water in their homes.

As previously mentioned, one way to get rid of hard water is to install a water softener.  The water from your home is not considered hard unless it contains more than 1 GPG of dissolved hard materials however, water with up to 3.5 GPG is considered soft.  Noticeably hard water contains upward of 3.5 GPG with 10.5 GPG being considered extremely hard.  Anything between the two extremes is considered moderately hard and should be properly treated.

Damage To Home From Hard Water

Hard water is more annoying and expense than a risk to the health of you and your family.  In fact, many issues that are created because of a home’s hard water supply stay hidden until an actual malfunction in the plumbing or your appliances bring it to light.  Scale can cake on to the inside of your plumbing, water heaters, and appliances causing major issues for you.  This on top of the issues that are general nuisances in the everyday running of your household.

One of the most common fixes for hard water is the installation of a water softener.  There are a variety of water softeners that people can install in their homes or businesses to improve the quality of your water.   The most common whole-house water softener that is installed is known as a salt ion-exchange water softener.  Salt ion-exchange water softeners have two tanks.  One of the tanks is filled with brine and the other special resin beads.  The water becomes soft by exchanging salt ion for hard minerals.

Another option is a salt-free water softener that operates in a similar manner as a salt ion-exchange water softener however uses potassium-chloride instead of softener salt.  Hard minerals are not reduced but instead prevent the minerals from being deposited as scale to plumbing and such.

Dual-tank water softeners are yet another option.  Unlike typical water softeners that disconnect from the water system when recharging making them basically out of commission during the process, dual water tanks always have on tank in use while the other regenerates.  Thus, no downtime in water usage.  For most families the water softening rejuvenation process in common water softeners takes place at night when water is most often not in use, for big families or families with varying schedules a dual water softener can be a better fit.

The Right Size Water Softener

Water softeners come in a variety of different sizes, the size of the softener you need for your household will depend on the size of your home and the number of people using water in your household.  It is important that when purchasing a new water softener, you select one that is the right size to handle the demands of your home and family.  Remember the physical size of the unit is not particularly important, it is the systems ability to remove minerals from the water at a pace that keeps up with your needs. This can be determined when the water from your home is analyzed.

Along with choosing the right size water softener for your home it is important to choose a softener with features and controls that are necessary.  It is important for homeowners to know what controls the regeneration cycle, how long each regeneration cycle takes, as well as the amount of water and salt needed for recharging.  Softeners use two different control options: automatic timing and demand-initiated regeneration no matter what option is on your softener, the salt needs to be monitored on a regular basis to prevent running low.

The professionals at Reynolds Water Conditioning can help you select and install the best option in water softener for your family.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.

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Improving the Water Quality in Your Home

There are a number of reasons that the water in your home could be discolored or taste funny.  Many of the causes of peculiar tasting, smelly, ill colored water comes from where the water is coming from on your property or the city.  There are steps that homeowners can take to improve the quality of drinking water no matter the source of the water.  From city water to well water Reynolds Water Conditioning company has a solution for your water.

City Water

When your water comes from a city source you can almost guarantee that any problems occurring with your water are derived from your property.  Some areas in the state of Michigan however are an exception to this such as Flint.  The municipal water source in Flint is contaminated with lead.  In this situation the problem with the water does not come directly from the property and therefore is difficult for you to treat within your home.

One of the things that you can do if you have issues with your city water is to evaluate the pipes in your home.  If there are changes that you can notice within the water such as color, taste, and changes to the water pressure this almost certainly means that there is an issue in your pipes.  Corrosion is known to cause partial blockages decreasing water pressure and adding a presence of ill tasting and smelling elements to the water supply.  If interior pipes are not found to be the source of your issue, then it is a good idea to check the exterior pipes of your home to check for leaks.  In no case do we recommend tackling issues with your plumbing alone.  It is always best to work with a professional.

Well Water

The process of determining where the issues lie within your well water is much simpler than it often is with city water.  The first step professionals will take is to test your homes water to determine what contaminants are present.  If the water is clear, then further investigation will need to be done with the infrastructure.  However, more often than not the problem will be a chemical imbalance in the water.  If the water balance is correct the first places to check are with the well pump and casing.   Leaks and improper seals can lead to contaminated water and sediment.

Water Filtration

Whether you have city or well water, water filtration systems can be installed to remove pollutants from your homes water and make your water taste better.  Water filtration units can be installed as point of use or point of entry.  The professionals at Reynolds can help you determine what type of system will work the best for the water quality in your home.

Whole-House Water Filters

A whole house water filtration system is in place to filter all of the water that is used within your home.  This includes the water you shower with, the water that flows through your shower, all of the water that exists a faucet is filtered when a whole house water filter is installed.  Water quality professionals install whole-house filters at the main water supply.

Point-of Entry Filters

When your water is on point most of the time but occasionally has an odor, weird color, or taste a point of entry water filter system installed on the kitchens water supply can improve the quality of the water you use for drinking and cooking.

Reverse Osmosis Systems

RO systems work to improve the quality of your water by passing it through multiple systems that work to eliminate bacteria, sediment, and other pollutants within the water.  This leaves the natural minerals in water and oxygen behind leaving great tasting water.  Reverse osmosis water systems require users to replace filters on a regular basis to keep the water quality at peak levels.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.

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