The Importance of High-Quality Drinking Water

Hydration is key to all living things, and without it, we would only live for about five days. Our bodies are more than 50% water and it helps maintain our normal body temperature, lubricates joints, and enables the body to rid waste through urination, sweat, and bowel movements. Doctors advise us to drink at least eight 8 oz. glasses of water every day and studies have shown that women, on average, will consume approximately 91 oz. of water and men will drink about 125 oz. of water every day. Part of this consumption of water is from foods such as fruits and vegetables. It seems quite simple why water is so important to our health, but understanding the different risks from contaminations and how to protect your drinking water can be more in-depth.

Is Tap Water Safe?

In general, tap water is considered to be safe to consume if it comes from a public water system that is run and maintained by a municipality. When drinking water exits a treatment facility and travels to your home, the quality standards must reach strict safety requirements. Unfortunately, even with these safety policies, it does not mean that the water is free of any contaminants, but that the levels of the pollutants are low enough not to cause any health risks. Accidents do happen and if the water supply does become contaminated with something that can create illness, the supplier must inform consumers within 24 hours and offer alternative suggestions for safe drinking water.

Types of Contaminations

There are a few ways that water can become contaminated. Water can contain microorganisms like parasites and bacteria that are added to the water from human or animal feces. It can also become contaminated from industrial waste such as spraying crops that contain chemicals or nitrates used in fertilizers that run off the land. Sometimes the natural deposits from underground can have various minerals like lead or mercury that can enter the water supply. Lead can also transfer to a water source through old lead pipes as well. Even pipes that claim to be “lead-free” can contain as much as 8% lead. To avoid lead consumption when using tap water, use water from the cold tap and to let the water run for a minute before using it.

A Solution to the Problem

Often, when a contamination notice is sent to homes about a water crisis, it is advised to boil your water for 24 to 48 hours, so many consumers are under the impression that contaminates can be removed by heating the water to cleanse it. Boiling water will indeed kill germs; however, contaminants such as lead, nitrates, and pesticides will not affectedly be removed using this method.  It may have an opposite consequence since boiling will reduce the amount of water when it evaporates, making the concentration of the contaminate even higher. There are four main types of water filters that are more beneficial for contaminant removal:

  • Activated Carbon Filters – These can remove organic contaminants that change the taste and smell. Certain systems are designed to remove chemicals such as chlorination by-products, pesticides, and some metals like copper or lead.
  • Reverse Osmosis – This filtration system can remove nitrates, sodium, pesticides, and petrochemicals.
  • Ion Exchange – This type of filter can remove minerals like calcium and magnesium, and they are used in combination with other systems such as carbon absorption or reverse osmosis.
  • Distillation – This method creates distilled water by collecting condensation of steam from boiling water.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your home’s unique water quality needs, including arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more. To learn more information on our water treatment solutions, including water softeners and conditionerswater filtration and purificationreverse osmosis drinking water, and iron and odor removal, visit https://reynoldswater.com.



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Water Filters 101


Water is one of the most important elements on this planet and without it, we would only live a few short days. Our bodies are made up of roughly two-thirds of H2O and to keep a healthy balance, we need to consume 2.4 liters of water each day. It comes to no surprise that new ways are constantly being found in order to provide us with more clean, pure water to nourish ourselves. In order to remove many of the harmful impurities from our water, the use of water filters is a solution to this problem. How important are water filters you may ask? Let’s take a closer look at what a water filter is.

How Filters Work

Water filters use two different techniques in the removal of dirt and debris. The first is physical filtration in which water is strained by a physical barrier such as a thin gauze or fine textile membrane to remove the larger particles. The second method is done thorough chemical filtration, which involves water passing through an active material, such as carbon, that removes impurities as they pass through chemically. There are 4 primary methods used for water filters that use a combination of physical and chemical filtration:

Activated Carbon Filters

This type of filter is the most common and popular of the options available that are based on charcoal. Charcoal is a form of Carbon that is very porous because it has a big internal surface area that can trap foreign particles. Larger contaminants are stuck on the outside, thus being removed from the water. Carbon can also act as a magnet for items such as lead and VOCs that continue to remove particles internally as water passes through the filter. On the chemical aspect, chemicals like Chlorine are removed during a chemical reaction when water is in contact with Carbon. The main disadvantage of this type of filter is after time it will get clogged with impurities and need to be replaced, which can add additional costs down the road. 

Reverse Osmosis

Filtration that removes contaminants by water pressure to force tap water through a semipermeable membrane is called Reverse Osmosis. The membrane is an effective, very fine filter that allows the water to pass through but the contaminants like Lead, Mercury, and Iron stay behind. The downside is certain items such as some pesticides, solvents, and metals like Chlorine and Radon can not be removed with Reverse Osmosis.

Distillation

A natural option for filtration can be done with the simple process of steam distillation that involves heating water to boiling and then cooling the steam to remove the contaminants. Most contaminants have a higher boiling point than water which is why they are left behind when the water becomes steam. The steam is collected and transformed back to water in a separate container. The disadvantage to this type of filtration is some contaminants such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) boil at a lower temperature than water and they evaporate with the steam and can remove beneficial minerals in natural water during the filtration process.

Ion Exchange

This filter is very good at softening hard water by removing limescale. The process is done with chemical filtration method by releasing ions, like sodium, and exchange them for unwanted ions like heavy metals found in your water. The result is better-tasting water, however, the sodium is simply another form of contaminant, so the ion exchange doesn’t exactly make the water “pure”. This option is not the best for people on low-sodium diets. The second disadvantage of ion-exchange filtration is that it will need to recharge the filters occasionally with more sodium ions by adding a certain type of salt.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditionerswater filtration and purificationreverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.



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Why You Should Have A Water Filtration System

Without water we could not live so it’s easy to see why choosing the best source for the cleanest water is an important decision to make. Industrial chemicals, heavy metals, and pesticides are found in water supplies all over the world and it is up to us to protect ourselves and our families from the pollution we can potentially put into our bodies. Fortunately, there are many affordable options that are available to produce and improve water quality.

Knowing Your Water

The first step to improve your water quality is to know exactly what type of water you are dealing with. There are several ways that water testing can be performed, some more accurate than others. The most simplistic form of testing is by using your senses of sight, smell, and taste. With sight, you may notice cloudiness or particles that float. If the coloring is red, brown, or orange it could indicate rust from corroded pipes. As for the smell, certain aromas will inform you of chemicals that are in the water, such as bleach type, which could be chlorine from the local facility. Or perhaps you smell rotten eggs, and this may indicate somewhere through the water’s course there is bacteria growth. Lastly, with taste, if the water instantly doesn’t taste normal it is best to never swallow it. The next option for water testing is to have a professional water treatment company test your water supply or purchase an at-home water test kit. These tests can determine if the water contains harmful materials and reveal the water’s pH and hardness. If your water source is from a private well, it is advised to have the water tested twice a year.

Water Filter Options

Water filters come in a variety of shapes and sizes and each one has unique features that will benefit a home differently depending on your water quality needs.  The first question to ask yourself is what impurities you want removed from your water. After reviewing your water quality report or speaking to your professional water treatment company, you can decide what type of filter you need to use.

  1. Pitcher filter- The simplest water filters to use that fit inside a pitcher that can be kept inside the refrigerator. This style is inexpensive and easy to use but the lifetime is short and typically only removing few contaminants such as chlorine from the water.
  2. Faucet mount filter- this style is exactly as its name implies and is located directly under your faucet. They require little installation with easy replacements and are an inexpensive option. These filters can remove a decent number of contaminants but be sure to research what exactly it can remove to be safe.
  3. Countertop filters- These filters will not take up space under your sink but can however clutter your countertops. They work best for filtering large amounts of water without having to modify any plumbing. Installation can be done by hooking to your faucet or be freestanding as well. These do not clog as often as a faucet-mounted system but are not compatible with all types of faucets either.
  4. Reverse osmosis– A process where water is forced through a membrane that filters molecules that’s are physically larger than the water molecules. This type of filter is good for removing minerals but cannot remove chlorine or volatile organic compounds, so many ROS systems combine prefilters and carbon filters to help this issue.
  5. Whole-house filters- This type of filter is installed directly in the water main and filter all water coming into the home. These have a long lifetime and are an inexpensive option for removing sediment, rust, and sometimes even chlorine. Unfortunately, they can not remove most other contaminants, so it is important to pair this with another drinking water filter. They are on the pricier side and must be installed by a professional water treatment company.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your home’s unique water quality needs including arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditionerswater filtration and purificationreverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.

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Types of Salt for Your Water Softener

As a homeowner, certain appliances will need to be maintained in order to keep your house running efficiently, including your water softener. Regularly, the salt supply will need to be replenished in order to keep hard water from coming into your water system. While out shopping, you may find yourself questioning what the best choice for salt is exactly where to purchase since there is a variety of choices to choose from. In today’s article we will discuss the difference between those salt options and help you decide which choice is best for your softener and home.

Sodium Chloride Options

Water softeners or conditioners can be used with either sodium chloride (most commonly called salt) or potassium chloride. When at your local grocery store or home improvement store one thing to keep in mind when looking at the bags for purchase is the purity levels. Many of the bags sold in these places will contain a high level of water-insoluble material. This impurity over time can cause buildup in the water reservoir or cause the water softener to not function properly. If you notice this buildup occurring the brine tank will need to be cleaned more often to avoid this from happening in the future. A closer look at sodium chloride and you will see there are 3 different forms to choose from: pellets, crystal, or block salt. Salt pellets are the most common and typically are less costly than potassium pellets. Like many things found in the consumer world spending a little more money upfront for higher quality products is well worth the expense since this typically will mean less maintenance and fewer cleanings needed to keep your softener functioning efficiently.

Potassium Chloride as Alternative

If sodium chloride doesn’t seem to be the right fit for your home’s needs, the alternative option can be potassium chloride for your brine tank. Potassium chloride is 99.9% sodium-free, so this option is great for individuals who are looking to decrease their sodium intake. The largest disadvantage with this type is the price tag attached, which is much higher in comparison to sodium chloride. It can also be less readily available when searching at your local stores with fewer options. Switching your home from sodium to potassium may require an increase of salt dosage on the program settings value by an extra 10% to guarantee proper regeneration. If needing assistance with this, Reynolds Water Conditioning technicians can assist with this.

Salt Maintenance Tips

Checking your salt level inside your brine tank monthly is recommended. If your system regenerates more frequently, more checks and salt refills will need to be done more often as well. The salt in the brine tank should be at least 3 to 4 inches above the water level, but less than 4 inches below the top of the brine tank for best efficiency. If regular checks on the salt levels are performed you will begin to have nonconditioned water through the household and will notice hard water as indicated by an orange appearance and foul odor. Be sure to loosen any hardened salt around the edges of the tank or any large solid masses (also known as salt bridges) before adding additional salt each time.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditionerswater filtration and purificationreverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.

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Improving Water Quality Through Filtration


Take a minute to look inside the tank of your toilet, what do you see?  Do you see a collection of rust, sediment, and/or sand? That same collection of debris is accumulating inside your plumbing and water heater.  It is pretty standard to assume that when any mechanical system in your home becomes saturated with gunk build up the quality of the system and the products of the system are compromised.  The goal for homeowners is to avoid situations where this occurs.  One way this happens is with the installation of a whole house water filter.

When a whole house water filter is installed it can act as a barrier that quietly protects your home.  A filter will prevent crud from settling into the systems throughout your home such as the toilet, water softener, and hot water tanks. 

Benefits of Installing a Water Filter System for Your Home

Layered Protection

With the installation of a whole house water filter system you are layering the protection to your appliances.  You are preventing the sediment from reaching your appliances, plumbing, water softeners, toilets, and such.  Many appliances have small plastic and rubber pieces that are used in the use of different household appliances.  Small amounts of debris will damage seals in appliances over time.  When a seal becomes damaged it will leak and as we all know this ends up costing us time and money.  A filter removes the gunk such as sediments, debris, dirt, and gunk in general.  For homeowners there is an increase in appliance longevity and a piece of mind that your equipment will be reliable for longer. 

Eliminate Unexpected Water Surprises

Both city and well water sources can become compromised from unexpected elements in the system.  When this occurs homeowners can receive quite the surprise at the tap. 

City Water Issues

  • Water Main Break
  • Hydrant Flush
  • New Construction and New Water Connections

All of these events will knock iron and sediment buildup into the water supply.  This in turn creates sludge, orange water, and dirt from coming into your home.

Well water quality is affected by outside sources as well.  The quality of the water can change from season to season. 

A whole house water filter helps to remove the iron that exists in some water sources.  When a water filter is installed the iron in the water is filtered out.  This helps to prevent the staining that occurs on laundry, appliances, faucets, and more.

Filter Operation and Maintenance

Filtration systems function without electricity, without salt, and without waste.  There are no controllers to worry about, batteries to change, or clocks to reset.  In fact, whole house water filtration systems are simple to install and can be added to any water treatment system.  In order to properly maintain a filtration system for your home you will be required to change the filter periodically.  The number of times a filter needs to be changed depends on the quality of the filter, use, and the filters rating.

When choosing a filter consider the following: the physical size of the filter, the Micron rating, flow rate, and filter life.  Larger filters naturally have more surface area which often means that they last longer, increase the quality of the water and water pressure. Larger filtration systems are needed in homes with more than two family members.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.



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Hard Water Myths Dybunked


There are many myths surrounding hard water.  Although hard water is often not detrimental to your health it can be a considerable nuisance.  Below we will look further into the most common hard water myths and debunk them.

Myth #1: Hard water is responsible for clogging ALL types of plumbing materials

Truth: Hard water contains minerals including calcium and magnesium both of which are known to stick to the interior of galvanized steel pipes which leads to build-up and in turn clogs pipes.  Galvanized steel plumbing is commonly found in homes that were built between 1940 into the late 1970’s. 

Homes built after the late 1970’s or homes that have had their plumbing replaced most often use pipes that are made from copper.  Copper plumbing does not allow for calcium or magnesium build up to form.  Thus, not ALL types of plumbing materials are responsible for hard water clogs.

Myth #2: Hard water minerals are contaminants

Truth: Hard water does contain a number of minerals however, minerals are not contaminants, minerals are nutrients.  Drinking water that is rich in essential minerals like calcium and magnesium is healthy for individuals.  Mineral rich drinking water helps protect the health of individuals and can lead to lower risks of heart disease and stroke. 

Myth #3: Water softeners produced filtered water

Truth: Water softeners do not in fact filter water at all.  Softeners use a process of ion exchange which is used to exchange minerals in the water for sodium.  Water softener units take “tainted” tap water and create water that can be used for drinking, cooking, showering, laundry, dish washing, and more.  The water processed through a water softener is NOT filtered and can often have a salty taste depending on a number of different variants.  To remove the saltiness from water that has gone through a water softener a point of use filter can be installed to faucets.  Most individuals are not bothered by the taste of drinking water that comes from a softening unit however a filtration system does remove the sodium in water if a homeowner is bothered by the taste.

Myth #4: Hard water works well for bathing, cleaning, and laundry

Truth:  Hard water often leaves behind a residue that contains minerals which are not the best for bathing, cleaning, or laundry.  Water that goes through a water softener is known as soft water.  Soft water is ideal for bathing, hard water is known to create dry hair and skin because of mineral deposits that it leaves.  In laundry and household cleaning hard water is known to leave stains and create a filmy residue that is not found in water that has gone through the rejuvenation process that takes place within water softening units.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.



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Removing Iron and Manganese from Well Water


How many homeowners can honestly say they would be okay drinking water from their taps that comes out brown?  ZERO, that’s how many!  Brown water occurs because of contamination in their water from Iron and Manganese, common elements found in well water.  Thankfully there are water treatment options available to remove these contaminants.  Both Iron and Manganese are found in soil thus washing into the well water drinking supply.  The good thing is that you don’t have to live with contaminants in your water.

Contaminants in your homes water supply certainly can be a nuisance. Iron and Manganese cause several issues including metallic tasting water, stained laundry, clogged plumbing, and an oily or crust sheen on the surface of the water. This is one of the reasons high levels of the contaminants are treated using whole house water treatment systems.

In 1974 the federal government set in place visual standards for water because of the effects of Iron and Manganese.  Although state health-based standards are not in place for metals in drinking water, there are some concerns that high levels of manganese are bad for formula-fed infants. Infant formulas naturally contain manganese, so the National Health Department recommends mixing formula with water with a low manganese level. 

Iron and Manganese Testing

It is easy to recognize elevated levels or iron and manganese in water including a bitter, metallic taste and orangish-brown staining on bathroom fixtures, clothes, and more.  It is however important to test the water before treating it in order to determine the amount of minerals and metals that are in the water.  Two types of metals are commonly found in a homes water supply including reduced and oxidized.  Water that has a reduction in iron and manganese often looks clear, initially however will form solid orangish brown solid particles.  Water with oxidized iron and manganese will have visible particles upon being drawn from the well. 

Water Treatment Options

Once your well water is tested and you are told what type and amounts of iron and manganese are in the water, water treatment specialists like the ones at Reynolds Water Conditioning can help you determine the best treatment option for your home.  It is important to note that some filtration such as oxidation filtration which injects oxygen into the water to remove impurities only removes iron.  The water will need an additional chemical treatment to remove manganese. 

Water softeners are often installed to treat hard water.  They can also remove small amount of iron and manganese.  Water softening units use an ion exchange process which replaces iron and manganese with sodium.  The metals are removed from the softeners filtering resin through a process of backwashing. 

Another treatment option to remove iron and manganese from water is through a point of use reverse osmosis systems.  This treats water at the tap which is usually where drinking and cooking water is drawn from.  The filter uses different membranes to remove unwanted molecules in water to be filtered from the water.  Although this is a fairly simple method of getting water without metal it does not treat water throughout the house.  Thus, staining will still occur in bathrooms and in laundry and water in other parts of the house will have the metallic taste. 

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.



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Best Options In Treating Your Homes Water Supply


When it comes to figuring out the what the best option is for treating your homes water supply there is a lot of confusion and conflicting information within the industry.  Homeowners will find a variety of solutions when it comes to water treatment including solutions that treat the whole house and point of use options.  Although some within the industry like to sell water treatment options as interchangeable it is crucial that homeowners understand that each treatment option is unique and deals with removing different contaminants through difference processes.  Each system has distinctive qualities in how they treat the water in your home. 

Whole House Water Treatment Solutions

Water Filters and Water Filtration Systems: Water filter systems often use a carbon filtration solution to treat foul odors and improve the taste of water throughout your home.  Carbon filters are known for treating a variety of elements in water including: chlorine, chemical tastes & odors, organic chemicals, and pesticides.

Municipal city water sources are known for their overpowering use of chlorine.  The installation of a whole house carbon filtration system is often recommended to stabilize drinking water and making bath water less irritating to sensitive skin.  Some private wells may also benefit from the installation of a filtration system especially those in more urban settings where organic chemicals are used in treating crops.  These chemicals can run off into water sources or soak into the Earth affecting the quality of the water coming from the well.

Water Softeners and Water Conditioners:

Water softeners and conditioners are common and well-known amongst homeowners for removing hard water minerals and preventing limescale build up in appliances and plumbing.  Hard minerals such as calcium and magnesium can be found in both city water and private well water.  Soft, scale-free water can be delivered throughout the house with the installation of a whole house water softening unit. 

Reverse Osmosis:

The biggest misconceptions in water treatment center around reverse osmosis systems.  Reverse osmosis systems are commonly mistaken for providing the same treatment to your homes water as water filters and water softeners.   RO systems should not be advertised to treat chlorine, foul odors, hard water, or iron removal.  Reverse osmosis water treatment systems have a semipermeable membrane that removes 95 to 99% of contaminants from your homes water.  However, the membrane contained in RO systems don’t compare to the carbon filtration or water softening units.

In fact, chlorine and hard water can actually taint the RO membrane.  In fact, water should be treated before it is sent through a reverse osmosis system.  When RO systems are used in conjunction with a water softener and filtration system you will prolong the life span of your RO system thus leaving you with the highest quality drinking water.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.



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Answers to The Top 5 Questions About Water Softeners


There are many questions that people have when contemplating the installation of a water softening or filtration unit in their home.  Professional water treatment specialists such as the professionals at Reynolds Water Conditioning can help.  Below you will find the top questions we receive on a regular basis when clients are considering treating their homes water supply.

What is Hard Water?

Hard water is water that contains more than 1 grain per gallon of minerals that include magnesium, manganese, calcium, and magnesium carbonate.  Our professionals can test the water in your home to determine if you have hard water or if there is another issue affecting your homes water supply.

Should I Have Concerns About Hard Water?

Hard water can affect your home in a number of ways, in particular the fixtures and plumbing fixtures.  Heat dissolves the minerals in hard water which causes the minerals to re-crystalize and create what is known as scale.  Scale affects all appliance that use running water and reduces their life space.  This can include your homes water heater, dishwasher, washing machine, ice maker, water dispenser, and more. 

Another common concern that comes from hard water is the soap scum that builds up in your showers.  The combination of soap and hard water forms a scummy substance that deposits on your shower and also your skin. Even after rinsing really well, hard water can leave soap residue to build up on your skin thus leading to skin irritation.

Should I Soften My Water?

Of course, softening your water, like any decision around your home is a personal decision.   Hard water does have obvious affects on your home as stated above.  If you choose to soften your hard water with the use of a water softener, you will find yourself using less soap, less detergent, and fewer chemicals overall.  You will notice that you no longer have to work so to get your dishes and clothes clean.  A water softener will also reduce the scale build up on glasses and dishes as well as on faucets, fixtures, and plumbing. 

Are There Any Reasons I Would Not Want to Use a Water Softener?

There are two types of water softeners: those that use salt to regenerate and those that use potassium chloride.  If you need a low sodium diet it is important to consider the options in water treatment.  When people are talking about water softeners, they are often talking about using water softeners that use salt.

Why Do Water Softeners Add Salt to Soften Water?

Water softeners use salt ions that attract hard minerals in water including magnesium and calcium ions, and then depositing them on water softener resin.  Salt ions trade places with mineral ions which is why the water from the water softener contains more salt than “normal” tap water.  There is about an extra 150 to 300 milligrams per quart of water which works out to about the same amount that you would find in a slice of bread.

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.



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What You Need to Know Before You Purchase Any Water Treatment System for Your Home


First things first, have the water in your home tested by professional water treatment specialist.  Take labeled water samples from each faucet in your home in for treatment.  Believe it or not water from the kitchen sink may not test for the same contaminants as the water in the bathroom or laundry room.  This could happen for a number of reasons but is important to ensure proper treatment of the water in your home.  Processing different points of access will also allow you to recognize issues that can be corrected with whole house water treatment systems such as water softeners or point of use water treatment solutions such as reverse osmosis and water filtration systems. 

If the water in your home tests positive for contaminants, then the installation of a treatment system could be the next necessary step in remedying the issue.   When you have to install a water treatment solution it is important that you understand these systems will require routine maintenance and care.  It is crucial that homeowners understand that containment free water requires effort on the part of the homeowner no matter water treatment solution is installed.  Water filtration systems will need new filters installed, water softeners will require the input of salt or potassium chloride, and reverse osmosis systems will require cleaning of existing filters and new filters. 

It is important for consumers to be smart when having their water tested.  Some man-made chemicals that have been found in the water supply of homes have been associated with serious health problems.  These contaminates are not always found in without special analysis.  If you suspect the results of your water tests are inaccurate then it is important to have the water tested more thoroughly by a state certified laboratory.  Most general water treatment companies can see basic water quality components such as water hardness, pH, arsenic, iron, and sulfur. 

After you are sure the results of your homes water are accurate and have been analyzed to your satisfaction the levels that have been detected will tell you what type and level of water treatment is needed. 

Once this process has been satisfactorily completed the next step is to choose a system to treat your homes water.  Depending on your water analysis you can determine if you need whole house treatment, point of use treatment, or both.  Choose products that come from companies that can offer an established reputation and can offer referrals.   Often times companies that sell water treatment systems such as reverse osmosis, iron filtration, water softeners and conditioners will also offer service plans, maintenance options, and salt and potassium chloride delivery. 

The experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning have a solution to your homes unique water quality needs including: arsenic, bacteria, chlorine, rotten egg smell, fluoride, hard water, iron, lead, acid, tannins, radon, and more.  More information on our water treatment solutions including water softeners and conditioners, water filtration and purification, reverse osmosis drinking water, and iron & odor removal can be found online at https://reynoldswater.com.



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