August is National Water Quality Month

Imagine life without water. It’s a terrible concept if you really think about it. A life without water or a lack of reliable, clean drinking water is not a welcome thought. Those who live in certain parts of the world are all too familiar with the barriers to obtaining clean water, while others don’t fully recognize the scarcity of this natural resource. National Water Quality Month was created to prompt people to be mindful and preserve our sacred availability of fresh water.

Earth’s Freshwater

Despite water covering 70% of Earth’s surface, only 3% is freshwater, with just 1% being easily accessible to sustain the needs of over 7 billion people. That’s a hard fact to swallow, especially when you look at a globe or satellite imagery and see Earth primarily blue. According to the U.S. Geological Survey, more than 68% of Earth’s freshwater is found in icecaps and glaciers, and just over 30% is in the ground. This leaves only .03% of our freshwater to fill lakes, rivers, and swamps.

It’s remarkable to think that the water sustaining both land and marine life on Earth is so scarce. This understanding highlights the necessity to use this resource wisely. A crucial beginning or first step is to educate ourselves and future generations on the sensible use and protection of water.

The Start of National Water Quality Month

National Water Quality Month can be traced to two U.S. congressional acts from the early 1970s to safeguard our water resources. The 1972 Clean Water Act initiated federal efforts to combat water pollution by prohibiting the excessive discharge of toxins into waterways and established standards for surface water used by humans. The Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974 further ensured the quality of groundwater and public water systems.

In 2005, National Water Quality Month was established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with support from the United Nations. This initiative aimed to encourage discussions about preserving our natural water resources, focusing on steps households and communities can take to guarantee future generations have access to safe and clean drinking water.

The Importance of Freshwater & How It Affects You

Consider the importance that water has on everything, not just humans, but also wildlife and plants – a whole ecosystem that cycles through generations. Think about the little things that you do on a daily basis that may or may not have a negative effect on water. By being aware of your specific impact, you’ll hopefully be more cognizant in making a positive change. 

Lifesaving Freshwater:

  • All living beings require water, specifically freshwater for drinking. Saltwater, due to its salinity, isn’t suitable for direct consumption.
  • Freshwater is crucial for irrigating crops. Saltwater is detrimental to most plants because it can dehydrate them and affect soil quality.
  • We rely on freshwater for sanitation, such as washing, cleaning, and other hygiene-related activities.
  • Freshwater habitats like rivers, lakes, and wetlands support distinct biodiversity. Many species are adapted only to freshwater environments and can’t survive in saltwater conditions.
  • Industries prefer freshwater for many processes since saltwater can be corrosive and requires desalination for many applications, which is energy intensive.
  • Many regions base their economy on freshwater sources. For instance, cities by freshwater lakes or rivers often have bustling economies centered on trade, tourism, and fishing.
  • Access to clean freshwater is directly linked to health. Contaminated freshwater sources can lead to diseases like cholera, dysentery, and other water-borne illnesses.

Given its scarcity and the vital role it plays in various facets of life and society, freshwater’s importance is especially pronounced. Protecting and managing freshwater resources is crucial for sustainable development and the well-being of all life on Earth.

Charities & Resources for Clean Water

Many organizations worldwide are dedicated to providing people with clean, reliable drinking water or mobilizing efforts to free our waterways from pollution. Below, we list a few trustworthy sources to review and consider their cause. If you’re able to make a monetary donation, great. But really, the primary purpose of this article is to share some knowledge about water as a precious resource and hopefully help people make a conscious effort to sustain our water for generations.

Learn more and consider donating to:

Clean Water Action – Michigan: https://cleanwater.org/make-special-gift-protect-clean-water-michigan

The Ocean Clean Up: https://theoceancleanup.com/donate/

World Water Reserve: https://worldwaterreserve.com/clean-water-charity-organizations/

For even more information, visit: The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), The Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), The Clean Water Act (CWA), The World Health Organization (WHO), and your local water utility to stay abreast of the latest happenings in your community and beyond.

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Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/

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Whole House Water Filtration – Rochester, MI

Whole home water purification systems are available to tackle the different types of water quality challenges present in Michigan cities. It’s crucial to select the right technology and size the system appropriately to handle your household’s water consumption. A system installed by professionals is vital, along with consistent maintenance over time to ensure its longevity and effective operation.

While signs of water quality concerns like unpleasant odors and tastes, staining of clothes and bathroom fixtures, etc., signal existing issues, the recommended initial step is to conduct a water test. This test will identify the contaminants or minerals present in the water and their respective quantities. This information is key to making an informed system recommendation and establishing a pathway toward excellent water quality in your home.

Water Softener Systems

A water softener serves as a form of whole home water filtration system, engineered to eliminate hard water minerals such as magnesium and calcium, along with dissolved iron and manganese from the water. For water carrying high concentrations of iron or manganese, often known as “the stainers,” an “up-flow” water softener is suggested to avert mineral accumulation at the base of the water softener. Additionally, high-efficiency water softeners, which are more effective in terms of water and salt utilization, are more desirable.

Systems exist that can eliminate unpleasant tastes and odors, sediment, and a host of unwanted minerals and contaminants in the water. Initiating a water test sets the stage for the appropriate solution. View our available water softeners and water conditions, or contact Reynolds Water to schedule service.

Whole House Water Filtration – Arsenic and Radon

Other contaminants found in Michigan well water include Radon and Arsenic. Radon present in water can be securely extracted using an aeration system. This system stirs the incoming well water inside a sealed chamber, allowing the radon gas to separate from the water. The gas is then safely expelled to the exterior environment.

Arsenic in water can be addressed by setting up tanks at the home’s entry point filled with a special resin designed to trap arsenic before it enters your home’s water system. Drinking water systems can also leverage reverse osmosis technology to eliminate arsenic effectively. Consult with a tech at Reynolds Water to determine the system that best suits your needs.

Reynolds Water Conditioning is a full-service water filtration and testing facility, serving Michigan residents since 1931. Contact us for further questions and assistance with your water needs.

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Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/ 

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Removing PFAS From Your Drinking Water – Farmington Hills, MI

PFAS in Drinking Water: Analyzing Health Risks and Methods for Elimination

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS, comprise a family of synthetic chemicals in production and have been utilized across various industries since the 1940s. These chemicals are frequently incorporated into products such as Teflon, water and stain-repellent fabrics, paints, waxes, and firefighting foams. The latter being a significant contributor to groundwater contamination near airports, military bases, and firefighter training facilities. There is a growing concern as these chemicals have been identified in alarming concentrations in drinking water sources throughout the United States.

PFAS chemicals, particularly PFOA and PFOS, have been the most widely manufactured and studied. They persist in the environment due to their long half-lives and can accumulate in the human body over time. Studies indicate that exposure to these substances can harm human health. In response to these findings, production of these chemicals has ceased in the United States. However, they are still manufactured in other nations, and products containing these chemicals could be imported into the U.S.

Considering the potential health risks associated with PFAS, it is vital to consider strategies for eliminating or reducing their presence in drinking water sources. Various filtration methods can be effective in removing these chemicals from water. Understanding the gravity of the issue and adopting effective measures can contribute to safeguarding public health.

Health Impacts of PFAS Contamination in Water

Exposure to PFAS, or per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, has been linked to various adverse health effects in humans. When humans or animals consume these chemicals, whether through food or water, they are absorbed and can build up in the body. Since PFAS has a protracted presence in the human body, continuous exposure from various sources can cause levels to escalate. Over time, this can reach a critical point where individuals experience detrimental health consequences.

Research has demonstrated that two specific PFAS chemicals, PFOA and PFOS, have the potential to induce a variety of adverse effects. In laboratory animals, these substances have been shown to affect reproductive and developmental processes negatively, cause damage to the liver and kidneys, and impair the immune system. Additionally, PFOA and PFOS have been associated with animal tumor development.

In human studies, the most consistent outcome associated with PFAS exposure is elevated cholesterol levels among those exposed. There are also more limited findings linking exposure to changes in infant birth weights. Specifically, for PFOA, there is some evidence of a correlation with cancer, while PFOS has been connected with disruptions to thyroid hormone levels.

Given the potential ramifications on health, it is vital to be vigilant about PFAS exposure, mainly through drinking water, and take necessary precautions to mitigate the risks associated with these chemicals.

Removing PFAS From Drinking Water

Several technologies can be employed to effectively eliminate PFAS, particularly Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS), from drinking water. Among these, ion exchange, activated carbon adsorption, and reverse osmosis have proven highly effective. For residential settings requiring whole-house filtration, ion exchange systems with a dual-tank design are emerging as a superior option due to their enhanced safety and effectiveness. This involves exchanging ions between the contaminants and a medium. At the same time, activated carbon adsorption traps contaminants on carbon particles, and reverse osmosis uses a semi-permeable membrane to filter out PFAS.

Reverse Osmosis: A Filtration System to Remove PFAS in Water

Reverse osmosis, a technology that employs a membrane for filtration, can be effectively utilized as a point-of-use system for purifying water from PFAS. This can be set up at specific water outlets, such as kitchen sinks, where it directly feeds a designated drinking water tap and appliances like ice makers or refrigerator water dispensers. The reverse osmosis system can be conveniently installed under the kitchen sink or in the basement beneath it, with a pipeline running up to supply the dedicated faucet.

To learn more about PFSAs, visit www.epa.gov/pfas/pfas-explained

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Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/

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Local Water Utilities Anticipate Higher Rates Due to New EPA Rule

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently proposed a new rule that limits the amount of PFAS, also known as “forever chemicals,” in drinking water. PFAS are correlated to cancer, high cholesterol, birth defects, infertility, weakened childhood immunity, endocrine disruption, weight gain, and more. These man-made chemicals are found in 99.9 percent of the population’s blood. 

The EPA said, “This rule will prevent thousands of deaths and reduce tens of thousands of serious PFAS-attributable illnesses.”

The new regulations will require PFAS to be at zero parts per trillion or unitless in public water. The EPA says the changes will keep people safe and are aiming to complete regulation standards by the end of 2023. 

Patrick Berge, a city Public Works Director, said, “If the EPA imposes these new regulations, Public Works will have to figure out how to filter the PFAS out of the water and dispose of them safely. That would be an expense to the rate-payer. You can be talking anywhere from a few million to tens of millions.” 

Ben Harris, a Utility District General Manager, said, “It will cost millions,” and that it would be difficult to follow.

The EPA stated that the alterations are crucial to ensure the safety of individuals from PFAS. The agency intends to achieve the final regulation by the conclusion of this year.

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Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com

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PFAS to be Regulated in U.S. Drinking Water

For the first time, the United States government will regulate PFAS (Perfluoroaklyl and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances) in the nation’s drinking water. PFAS do not break down under typical environmental conditions due to their tight chemical bond structure, which is why they are also dubbed “Forever chemicals.” It is suspected that these man-made chemicals can remain in the environment for thousands of years, though they have only been around for 60 years. 

Widely used in firefighting foams, cosmetics, non-stick cookware (Teflon), anti-static spray, clothing, pesticides, and much more, PFAS effortlessly contaminates soil and drinking water. Eventually, PFAS made its way into the food chain. It is estimated that 99.9 percent of people worldwide have PFAS in their bloodstream, including more than 200 million Americans in all 50 states. 

Due to their unbreakable nature, these cancer-causing carcinogens are in drinking water nationwide. Moreover, they slip through many filters and are undetectable by smell, taste, or sight. PFAS has been associated with various cancers, immune deficiencies, pregnancy complications, birth defects, and more. 

Now, a new regulatory proposal from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) would finally limit the amount of PFAS allowed in public drinking water. 

EPA administrator Michael Regan said, “EPA’s proposal to establish a national standard for PFAS in drinking water is informed by the best available science and would help provide states with the guidance they need to make decisions that best protect their communities.” 

A senior scientist at Environmental Working Group (EWG), David Andrews said, “The entire class of PFAS chemicals is a health concern. Action to reduce exposure cannot come soon enough.” 

If you are worried about PFAS in your drinking water, contact the water treatment experts at Reynolds Water today. 

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/ 

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Jackson to Share Water with Napoleon Township Thanks to $5M Grant 

The city of Jackson will now share its water with over 6,800 Napoleon Township residents thanks to a $5 million federal grant from the Consolidated Appropriations Act. 

Due to limitations and environmental concerns about its own water system, the township inquired into this partnership, according to Jackson Spokesman Aaron Dimick. The new 16-inch water main will be constructed over roughly nine-and-a-half miles along M-50 to Napoleon Township. 

United States Representative Tim Walberg, R-Tipton, proposed the Napoleon/M-50 Water Main Transmission Project as part of his 2022 member-designated projects. 

Walberg said, “Having had many conversations with local officials and constituents throughout Jackson County, it is clear that Napoleon Township is in significant need of water system improvements as they are outgrowing their existing system.” 

There is no specific timeline for the project, but Napoleon Township will secure capital to cover the cost of using Jackson water. City officials said the partnership would not cause Jackson water customers to accrue any extra fees. 

Napoleon Township Supervisor Dan Glalagher said, “This grant for a new, consistent source of clean water will greatly help Napoleon’s future business development, enhance growth of the area, and provide a backbone for the community’s long range goals.” 

Jackson’s Director of Public Works, Mike Osborn, said, “Our water treatment plant has the capacity to produce 24 million gallons of treated water a day and we’re currently only producing five million a day, so our facility definitely has the ability to be a regional water source.” 

A total of 16 groundwater wells are tapped into for Jackson’s water, which goes into the Earth about 400 feet below the surface of an underground aquifer. Then, the water is transferred by pump to a water treatment plant, where it is cleaned and tested. 

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/ 

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Water Softener Basics

A water softener is an appliance specifically made for ridding calcium and magnesium from water. All water is not the same, and it’s dubbed as “hard” when it has high amounts of magnesium and calcium.  Conversely, “soft” water does not have these minerals, or they are barely detectable.

Lakes and streams naturally have soft water. Underground water is usually hard in regions with high amounts of chalk, gypsum, and limestone. Water softeners remove these mineral components absorbed from the earth, making your water soft. 

Some water softeners work through either an ion exchange or salt-free devices. An ion exchange is the most common type of water softener, using sodium to replace calcium and magnesium metal ions. A large tank is filled with salt pellets, and as the water fills the tank, the sodium ions react with the calcium and magnesium, making it soft.

Salt-free devices use a mechanical filter to eliminate calcium but do not work with magnesium. These devices let water pass through a semipermeable membrane which rids it of roughly 98% of contaminants.  

Some benefits of water softeners include:

– Removing orange or yellow stains on sinks, shower walls, toilets, etc.

– Improving the mineral balance of the water

– Purifying toxins

– Reducing appliance repairs and unnecessary replacements

– Making general cleaning easier  

– Transforming unpotable water into potable water

– Eliminating scale build-up

– Minimizing eczema

Overall, water softeners can be a beneficial addition to your home. By purifying your water, you can effortlessly remove minerals that can negatively impact your home, body, and overall health.

Are you looking for a water purifier or need assistance choosing the best option? Contact the water conditioning experts at Reynolds Water today.

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/ 

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How Hair and Skin is Affected by Hard Water

Have you ever emerged from a shower in a new place – whether on vacation or at a family or friend’s house – and felt like your hair or skin were different? A jaw-dropping 85 percent of households throughout the United States have hard water, and many people are used to its effects on their bodies. 

Calcium, iron, or magnesium-rich water is evident by scale build-up in coffee makers, bathroom sinks, shower curtains and walls, bathtub faucets, and more. 

Skin and scalp that comes in contact with mineral-rich water can be left feeling dry, flaky, itchy, and irritated. Minerals are, in fact, beneficial for our health, but this external bombardment can be too much for skin and hair. 

Hair
Hair can be affected by having a residue that alters its overall texture, health, and appearance. If your hair feels filmy, thin, straw-like, dull, or limp, you more-than-likely have a hard water issue. Color-treated hair fades more quickly with hard water. Overall, hair loss or the inability to get the shampoo to a full lather are also signs of hard water. 

Skin
On the skin, chronic conditions such as eczema and psoriasis can be aggravated by hard water. The most common effect of hard water on the skin is extreme dryness. The lack of moisture and high levels of minerals can shift your natural skin hydration, leading to breakouts and other issues. 

Though many cities throughout the United States treat their water, others are left with untreated or well water that needs to be softened by the homeowner. To get a better snapshot of your home’s specific levels, contact a water treatment expert who can determine how to properly manage your water woes. 

Generally, filtration systems are the best bet to combat hard water. The price varies, but whole-house filters are important for ensuring your drinking, bathing, and washing water are safe and mineral-free. People living in apartments should also consider a shower head filter and faucet filters for drinking water.

Is your home or business troubled by hard water? Contact the water treatment experts at Reynolds Water Conditioning today for affordable solutions to improve your water experience. 

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/

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Michigan Creek Alarmingly Bright Green

Residents came across an alarming sight on December 12th. Plaster Creek was bright green near Cease E. Chaves Avenue, which borders Grand Rapids and Wyoming. Photos were taken by Steven Littell, and alerted authorities.

By the time the city of Grand Rapids got there on Monday, they had said the green color was gone. Various reporters who arrived the following day verified they saw nothing from the ordinary.    

“My significant other and I were driving by, and she said, ‘Look at the creek.’ I stopped and it was fluorescent green. It was like almost glowing. So, I got out and got a couple shots,” said Steven Littell and then notified others. “I came back and checked on it for the next hour or so — it ran green for pretty close to an hour.”

“It worried me. I thought somebody was dumping something that shouldn’t have been dumped in there. It didn’t look right. This goes right to the Grand, right to Lake Michigan, so it worried me,” said Littell.

Jeff Johnston, a spokesperson from the Michigan Dept. of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy said staff inspected the creek at the specified location noted from Littell and found that the green color had already run clear.

“The color appears to have been from a dye test, likely performed near where the color was observed, and that material dissipates quickly,” said Johnston.

The maintenance superintendent for Grand Rapids Wastewater and Stormwater agreed that it looked like a green dye test to determine where water is flowing. However, the city clarified that they did not run any such test on Monday.

The mystery continues as to exactly what and who caused this water change. If you are aware of any information, please share it with the Michigan Dept. of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy, or the City of Grand Rapids at: esd@grcity.us.  

For pure, clean drinking water, contact Reynold’s Water Conditioning today.

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/

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Six Ways to Clean Wastewater

Wastewater treatment is an imperative part of our lives; however, many people do not fully comprehend the process. There are several different options for creating clean water, which we will delve into in this article. 

Advanced Oxidation Treatment

This environmentally friendly chemical process utilizes oxygen and some hydrogen peroxide to purify water by removing organic compounds. High-quality water can be produced for cooling towers, irrigation, domestic, or industrial processes with advanced oxidation. This low-tech treatment option is fairly economical and does not produce air pollution as a byproduct. 

Dewatering With Pumps

If the wastewater is too polluted to be treated by other means, dewatering can come into play. Special “Dae Pumps” are specifically made for this and can separate the water from waste in lieu of filters. Dewatering can be implemented through a deep well, dug well, or farm well. Small communities typically benefit the most from this cost-effective option. 

Biological Treatment

Using living organisms, pollutants can be removed from wastewater with this cost-effective and low-energy option. There are various types of biological treatment, so it is important to select the right one for the community’s needs. Anaerobic and aerobic digestion is typically combined with biological treatments, sometimes requiring high surveillance and maintenance.  

Membrane Filtration

This type of water treatment is commonly found in areas that do not have an allocated wastewater treatment plant. This process filters the water with a semipermeable membrane (made of plastic or fabric) before it runs to the sewer. Since only a specific size of particles can get through, the membrane is filled with chemicals that kill pathogens, making the water potable. 

Gravity-Based Treatment

Sustainable and reasonably priced, the gravity-based treatment uses pipes to transfer wastewater into a settling tank. Once the sludge has fallen to the bottom, the clean water is removed first, followed by the waste, which is then sent to a sludge digestion tank. There, a bacterial treatment is implemented to digest the bacteria. 

Chemical Precipitation

Solids in wastewater are effortlessly broken down in this treatment process, also known as coagulation or flocculation. The chemicals used are typically sodium or potassium hydroxide and sodium chloride. They react with wastewater and form solids that are eventually separated from the purified water.                                               ___________________________________

Reynolds Water Conditioning was established in 1931 and is Michigan’s oldest water conditioning treatment company. Still owned and operated by the Reynolds family, we take pride in providing the highest quality products at a cost-effective price. If your tap water lacks the quality you deserve, contact us today at 800-572-9575.

Written by the digital marketing team at Creative Programs & Systems: https://www.cpsmi.com/

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